Reflexology Trial with Patients with Advanced Stage Breast Cancer.

There is a study out of Michigan State University recommends Reflexology to relieve shortness of breath and improve the quality of life for women with advanced stage breast cancer.

Source

(pubmed.gov) College of Nursing, Michigan State University in East Lansing. Published in Pubmed.com

Conclusions: Reflexology may be added to existing evidence-based supportive care to improve HRQOL for patients with advanced-stage breast cancer during chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy.Implications for Nursing: Reflexology can be recommended for safety and usefulness in relieving dyspnea and enhancing functional status among women with advanced-stage breast cancer.

Abstract

Purpose/Objectives: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of reflexology, a complementary therapy that applies pressure to specific areas of the feet.Design: Longitudinal, randomized clinical trial.Setting: Thirteen community-based medical oncology clinics across the midwestern United States.Sample: A convenience sample of 385 predominantly Caucasian women with advanced-stage breast cancer receiving chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy.Methods: Following the baseline interview, women were randomized into three primary groups: reflexology (n = 95), lay foot manipulation (LFM) (n = 95), or conventional care (n = 96). Two preliminary reflexology (n = 51) and LFM (n = 48) test groups were used to establish the protocols. Participants were interviewed again postintervention at study weeks 5 and 11.Main Research Variables: Breast cancer-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL), physical functioning, and symptoms.Findings: No adverse events were reported. A longitudinal comparison revealed significant improvements in physical functioning for the reflexology group compared to the control group (p = 0.04). Severity of dyspnea was reduced in the reflexology group compared to the control group (p < 0.01) and the LFM group (p = 0.02). No differences were found on breast cancer-specific HRQOL, depressive symptomatology, state anxiety, pain, and nausea.

PMID:23107851[PubMed – in process]

 


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